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20110701
20110731
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
woman from new york who in 1962 that to pakistan and converted to islam. >> welcome to the 27th annual "chicago tribune" printers row that size. a special thank you tour sponsors. before we begin today's program, please turn off your cell phone and all other electric devices. photographs are not permitted. today's program will be recorded for future broadcast on c-span's booktv. if there is tenet began for a q&a session with the author, we ask you to use the microphone located at the center of the room said the home viewing audience can hear a question. the schedule of when the program will air, go to www.booktv.org. please welcome moderator, it karen long and deborah baker, author of "the convert." [applause] >> good morning. it's wonderful to be here and thank you for joining us. i drove here from cleveland and i was delighted to be occupied with a complex object and engaging biographer. deborah baker seems allergic to the facile answer and drawn to flags that are complicated and eliciting more questions than answers. so if that is your cup of tea, you walked into the great room. bec
brooklyn, new york to karachi, pakistan and then she would move to the horror -- lahore, this is the first of the letters i found at the new york public library, which was my introduction to margaret marcus. may 1962, the hellenic torch. this is posted from alexandria egypt. after all of our goodbyes, after you mother betty and walter walked down the plank and drove off, i was overcome by profound sense of dread. i stood to attack rail for a long time completely stricken. the excitement of the weeks leading up to my departure gone. when the ship pulled away from the brooklyn pier condo late to the city city began to dance in the engine seemed to echo the pounding of my heart, a black and fathomless ocean slowly swallowing everything i own. it takes some time and many prayers before my fear began to subside. so she goes on to tell her parents about the various odd years on board. there is a captain and his great crew who are very suspicious of this journey that she was making to pakistan. mother come you imagine i was going to need men i still dressed for dining and dancing on board as if m
parents on board this ship, a brief crater taking her from new york to pakistan, and from there she moved to lahor. this was the first of the letters i found at the new york public library, which was my introduction to margaret markus. may 1962, the torch. this was posted from egypt. after all our good-byes after you, mother, betty, and walter walked down the gangplank and drove off, i was overcome with dread. i stood at the deck rail for a long time stricken. the excitement. weeks leading to departure gone. when it pulled up, the lights of the city dimmed, it was a black ocean swallowing everything i had ever known. it took some time and many prayers before my fear began to subside. she goes on to tell her parents about the various odd characters on board, and, you know, there's a captain and his greek crew who are very suspicious of her -- this journey that she was making to pakistan. mother, you imagined i was going to need my nice silk dress for dining and dancing on board. i was happy to leave that dress behind with betty, her sister, along with my corset, and my high hills i gave to
pakistan a strong message >> the pakistani relationship is difficult but it must be made to work overtime. but until we get through these difficulties, we will hold back some of the many that the american taxpayers have committed to give. >> some $800 million? >> yep. >> it's a lot of cash but is it a political move. our next guest called out the pakistani government in 2006 claiming they knew osama bin laden in's location. peter thompson joins me. he's the author of the new book "the wars of afghanistan." good to see you. >> thank you. >> i want to get your thoughts we reported that the half-brother of huh mean karzai in afghanistan has been assassinated. how does that affect the relationships? >> he was assassinated by the taliban. this reflects assistmatic policy of the taliban and their isi handlers, the intelligence organization is i think behind this as well. and also al-qaeda. this policy is a tool to eliminate real and potential enemies of the islamists they want to reimplant back in cob he will. >> so this is a blow to the u.s. in afghanistan? >> yes, and also the destabilization
claims under investigation now that pakistan spent millions here in america to influence u.s. policy. and the fbi is claiming pakistan's spy agency was secretly funneling money to this man, an american running a nonprofit group based in the washington d.c. that investigation heating up. >>> slumping home sales hit a seven-month low indicating continued weakness in the housing market in this country. how is the soft demand affecting the overall economy? america's asking. send us your questions for today's town hall usa. [ male announcer ] this is coach parker... whose non-stop day starts with back pain... and a choice. take advil no and maybe up to four in a day. or choose aleve and two pills for a day free of pain. way to go, coach. ♪ jenna: welcome back, everybody. we have this fox news alert. we've been telling you about this proposal, this long-term debt reduction proposal by the gang of sick, a bipartisan group of senators that have developed this plan. there they are on the screen. the question is, what happens next? what are they going to do to make this an actual reality? it
in cashmere. prosecutors charge that two alleged agents for pakistan punled millions of dollars as part of the plan. the complaint alleges the pair fault fied and concealed information from the u.s. government. they face up to five years in prison if convicted. pakistan and india have disputed the status of kashmir for decades. >>> israel has stopped another ship trying to break its blockade of gaza. the navy seized the ship, part of a larger flotilla leaving from greece. israel says any supplies onboard will be transferred legally to gaza. israel insists on controlling access to gaza because it says otherwise smugglers will try to ship weapons to militants. and a colorado air controller had a blood alcohol level exceeding the allowed limit. he reportedly works at a center that handles air traffic for several states. a family member said he was given the choice of resigning or entering rehab. no charges have been filed in that case. and 764 lucky couples get to tie the knot sunday in new york city. but first, they'll have to win a lottery that closes thursday. sunday is the first day fo
after the entire terrorist infrastructure inside of pakistan. >>dave: are we taking our eye off the ball? all we hear about is al qaeda? panetta and general petraeus saying we close to finishing them off. is that a public perception? >>guest: i'm concerned by the fact they do recite that there is a war on al qaeda and there are other groups like the indian mujaheddin who is in the to be a front for l.e.t. which operates openly in pakistan. a vast array of groups with the same ideology of al qaeda and we have to go after them just as much. >>dave: what role did pakistani play in this and are they our friend or foe? >>guest: the l.e.t. operate a huge infrastructure in magazine stage and bragged they have 200 facilities operating in pakistan and they have charity schools and pakistan does nothing about it. >>dave: and the funding of the military, we have cut off the military funding. is pakistan saying you need to start the money flowing again here? or we will in the help you? >>guest: that is the direction they are moving. i expect a rise in the attacks in afghanistan or to bring that mess
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
signal nato weakness, implications in places like syria and egypt and have implications like pakistan, as well. a lot rides on this more than just getting rid of khadafy, who yet again in past days has called for a return to terrorism something he used before and is threatening again. one more reason to get rid of him. >> gregg: last question -- there is a new study by the eisenhower research project and it concluded that u.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, h
and we do speaking and we do also helping christians that are being persecuted in countries like pakistan. and we help christians who are suffering all throughout the middle east. >> and how do you do that? >> none of your business. >> isn't it anyone's business who donates to you? >> of course. but you see, a lot of the times if you disclose information who you're helping, it end up biting. >> reporter: the business in fact shoebat leaves to his manager keith davies who was down the hall selling shoebat's anti-islam books. when cnn had specific questions about the business, like perhaps the names of the high-ranking generals and experts he says are on his board of advisors, well, shoebat said get the names from davies. >> walid said that you would be able to tell us about your advisory board. you guys said you have generals and other high-ranking officials? >> correct. >> can you tell us who they are? >> off the top of my head, yes. let me see. i'm trying to think. names gone blank. they'll come back to me in a second. major general -- i can't remember. four star -- a three star general
in vietnam, and a lot of the ways of the fight now, the india- pakistan war which defines what is going on in the subcontinent now. even at the end of his career and of his life, 1994, he was still in the game. he was still thinking strategically, and to him, the cold war, the effects of the cold war still were not over. he was concerned about russia, and his thesis was communism is dead in warsaw, but democracy has not yet won, and for that reason he was traveling back and forth to russia, worried about whether gorbachev or yeltsin was speaking on that topic. he got a call from president clinton, they had a conservation -- conversation about clinton's russia policy, and you could see how his policy changed along with the advice that was given by richard nixon. as i see it, that is the essence of the man. i would like to conclude by going back to senator dole's look cheap. he talks about the last sign he saw president nixon, at a luncheon held in the capital honoring the 25th anniversary of his first inaugural. president nixon stood and delivered a speech, capturing the global seen as o
, the india-pakistan war, which still defiance in many ways what is going on in the subcontinent now. even at the end of his career, end of his life, in 1994, he was still in the game. he was still thinking strategically. to him, the cold war -- the effects of the cold war still were not over. he was concerned about russia. his basic thesis was communism is dead in russia, but democracy has not yet won. for that reason he was traveling back and forth to russia, worried about the leaders in russia, speaking on the topic. he gets a call from president palin ton. they had a conversation about clinton's russia policy. you can see in the squept months clinton russian policy change along the advice that was given by richard nixon. that is, as i see it, the essence of the man. i would like to conclude by going back to senator dole's eulogy. he talks about the last time he saw president nixon at a luncheon held in the capital honoring the 25th anniversary of his first inaugural. without a note, president nixon stood and delivered a compelling speech, captures the global scene and sharing his visio
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)